The Best Advice I Know for Creative Success: Put in the Work

best-advice-i-know-creative-success

Lately, I’ve been bombarded with ads on YouTube featuring people who want to sell me the secret to wealth and success.

A great example is Tai Lopez, who puts on a facade of a modest, yet uber-successful entrepreneur who possesses the secret to becoming wealthy. (His latest sales tactic: humblebragging about his supposed million-dollar home as he gives you a tour.)

Tai Lopez in front of a mansion

His successful marketing tactics have inspired both satire and copy-cat marketers (like the guy below):

tai-lopez-wannabe

Who are these marketers targeting? People who want to be more successful, live a better lifestyle, go viral online, and/or build a business around their passions. People who want to be in the middle of this diagram:

what-you-love

Image credit: Eskimon

Finding this intersection between a lucrative career and doing what you love is difficult and unpredictable, so these marketers do their best to convince you that a) success is completely formulaic and reproducible, and b) they are the ones who know the formula better than anyone else. In other words, these people are getting rich by selling you the secret to getting rich.

Thankfully, the internet is also packed with artists, entrepreneurs, and creative professionals who publish their work without trying to sell you a magic formula. They focus on perfecting their craft and adding value to the world through their hard work. If you pay attention to the advice they give out, you hear a different story about success.

One such artist is Darius Kazemi. Having published over one hundred creative projects on the web since 2013, Kazemi has seen many of his most ambitious projects stay in obscurity and many of his silly projects go viral quickly. From this experience, Kazemi believes that internet success is a lot like winning the lottery.

“I believe that beyond a certain level of work you put into your project, success is entirely out of your hands,” he says on stage during his 2014 talk at XOXO Festival in Portland, Oregon. “Conceiving of a creative project and building it, that’s buying a lottery ticket.”

In other words, hard work, perseverance, and the right kind of promotion all improve your chances (i.e. earn you more lottery tickets), but there’s no guaranteed formula for success.

 

Some people may find this advice fatalist and demotivating, but I disagree. Ignoring fame and financial success in favor of execution and skill in the short run may actually improve your chance of success in the long run.

For example, Rick Rubin, the former co-president of Columbia Records, has said that when an artist is first starting out, “any commercial considerations usually get in the way.” In other words, a premature focus on money and fame can distract and misguide.

Kazemi concludes his talk by advising us to ignore those who claim to have the secret to winning the lottery, i.e. the magic formula to go viral or make more money online:

“There are two kinds of creative advice that I think you can get from creative people. The first is how to buy more lottery tickets and the second is how to win the lottery. I think the former can be extremely useful and I think the latter is nonsense.”

Since snake oil salesmen aren’t going anywhere any time soon, it’s up to us to choose who we pay attention to. My personal rule of thumb: the more confident someone is that they have an ironclad formula for success, the less likely they’re worth paying attention to.

“If there was a secret formula for becoming known, I would give it to you,” writes Austin Kleon, artist and author of Steal Like an Artist, “But there’s only one not-so-secret formula that I know: Do good work and share it with people.”

 

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About Jon Guerrera

I'm Jon Guerrera, a life hacker at heart and the man behind the scenes here at Living For Improvement. This blog documents all of my successes, failures, and lessons learned as I experiment with finding happiness and fulfillment. I also wrote an e-book. If you like what I write on the blog, you can grab a free copy by subscribing.